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Tuesday
Aug302011

SWEET CORN CEVICHE



There is all this chatter about 'back to school' and I feel like I just got in the summer mood! Not that other people going back to school means that much to me, but I know what is coming. It is just around the corner when people will start talking pumpkin and apples and the holiday Starbucks cup. I still need to go for another swim in the ocean, have a beach picnic and make popsicles! Let's just enjoy the corn and tomatoes and peaches a bit longer. I can see those of you in other parts of the country, the ones enduring some crazy weather patterns, shaking your head.

As simple this recipe is, it needs some defense in case you are thinking it looks too basic. First off, I used the corn I got in my CSA basket this week from the organic farm down the road and OH MY goodness, it was unbelievable. It's the end of August, and if there is ever a time to find sweet, creamy corn from a farmstand or farmers market, it is now. I've watched enough documentaries on the food system to make the effort for organic corn, and besides the ethics of it, the flavor and texture is completely different. The raw corn kernels marinate and soften up a bit, absorbing all the flavor (hence 'ceviche'). You could very well eat this as a side salad, in a quesadilla, mix it with a bit of queso fresco and use it as a condiment for whatever you're bbq-ing. The finely chopped serrano brings the perfect amount of heat, enough to warm up your mouth but not send you searching for a drink. I know I already said this about the tomato soup, but I mean it, this recipe is only as good as the ingredients you use. It is raw corn after all.

SWEET CORN CEVICHE // Makes 2 Cups
Inspired by a picture in Food&Wine
I paid attention to chop the ingredients pretty small, as I wanted the corn to be the star, and the rest to merely compliment - I really think this made a difference.

2 Farmstand Corn Cobs
Zest and Juice of one Lime
1 Generous Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil (use the good stuff)
1 Green Onion, finely chopped
1 Serrano Chile, seeded and minced
1/4 Cup Chopped Cilantro*
1/4 tsp. Sea Salt


1. Shuck the corn and use a sharp knife to cut off the corn kernels from all sides. Put them in a mixing bowl.
2. Add the zest and juice of the lime, good olive oil, green onion, serrano and stir to coat. Add the cilantro and sea salt and give it another stir. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes before eating for the flavors to blend. Taste for salt. Keep in a covered container in the fridge, it gets slightly more spicy with age.

* I know there are people who despise cilantro, but don't let that deter you from making this. You could substitute 2 Tbsp. finely chopped, fresh oregano leaves. It won't be quite as 'mexican' tasting, but it does need a fresh herb, and this is the second best option.

Wednesday
Aug242011

SEATTLE.



There is something that stirs in me as soon as I get off of a plane. It is a relief.

Weeks pass and the weight of everyday life builds up - the deadlines, cleaning, relationships, creative pressure, social planning and what not. I mull around in my own angst, which makes the world seem small. I lay awake at night worried that I am fresh out of ideas for the book - what vegetable have I not exhausted in my recipe writing yet? I needed this trip to get out of my own head. I needed to leave and to be reminded that this world is actually huge, that there is SO much out there, so many stories and things to try. I sat on the lightrail of Seattle en route to our hotel, just staring at all the people waiting to go somewhere and I wondered what they were worried about. We're all going to be alright... is it weird that I wanted to yell that out the window? For them and for me. Despite the amount of cheese and sugar I consumed in the past four days, my mind feels healthier.

I was thrilled to finally meet some friends I had, so far, only admired from my corner of the internet. We've exchanged emails and blog comments, but I got the chance to look at them in the face. It's strange how you feel like you know someone from behind a web address or twitter avatar, isn't it? Truth is, if they do it well and honestly, you pretty much do. Genuine people are easy to spot and a pleasure to know.

We spent our days with eating, walking, drinking coffee, and seeing friends on repeat. I just wanted to pop in here with a few words and a couple photos (Hugh didn't take many, he was busy eating), and assure you that after weeks of being burnt out of cooking in general, I feel more excited about being back in the kitchen. I'll bring you food next week, but 'til then, I think you should start planning a trip. Somewhere.

Anywhere.

Thursday
Aug112011

A SUMMER CHEESE PLATE.


Ahhh, it feels kind of nice to write a recipe without instructions. This is just to get you thinking beyond the usual, or maybe this is your usual with a few little additions. There is always a reason for a cheese plate, and I think one with a little extra thought goes a long way. We're going camping by the beach this weekend with family, and that's as good a place as any for a cheese plate, if you ask me.

I've catered a handful of dinner parties, and the selections below are some choices I've come to find popular by extremely close survey. We each have our favorites, and you should by all means include yours, but this combination is what makes sense to me for the end of summer. I like to keep the cheeses on the lighter side for warm weather, saving the cheddars, bries and bleus for the cooler months, this being an exception.


PARMIGIANO REGGIANO // RAW COW'S MILK
chisle off a few pieces, drizzle raw honey

CHEVRE // SOFT GOAT'S MILK CHEESE
rolled in finely chopped lemon thyme, chives, pinch of rosemary and ground pepper

MANCHEGO // AGED SHEEP'S MILK
with a bit of apricot jam

BABY MOZZARELLA // FRESH COW'S MILK
with slow roasted yellow tomatoes, basil and balsamic reduction

Here is a recipe for Heidi's tomatoes, mine were so juicy, I used half the oil suggested.
To make your own balsamic reduction, just simmer balsamic vinegar until it reduces to 1/3 of its original volume. Remember it will thicken even more as it cools. I suggest transferring it to some sort of glass vessel before it cools, as it is quite sticky.

Marcona Almonds
Fresh Grapes or Figs
Crostinis
Seeded Crackers
Let the cheese sit out a bit, don't serve it straight from the fridge.
And drink wine with it, because life's short and cheese and wine make all sorts of sense.
(update for those asking) Cheese forks are from Napa Style.

Tuesday
Aug022011

ROASTED EGGPLANT + ZA'ATAR PIZZA



I have three more months until my final manuscript is due for the cookbook, and to be honest with you, I've been a bit paralyzed in creativity. I know that process ebbs and flows, but when it comes to having a due date, I need a bit less ebb-ing and more flowing these days. I've kept a pretty good pace so far, a few bad calls (did you know that roasted pluots are, without question, too tart to eat? who knew?!), but I'm really happy with what we have so far. Now, about that last 30% of the content...

The thought of this combination had me quite excited yesterday, a little something different to throw on on your pizza. I would have hoarded this recipe for the book, but I have something similar in there already, so I can share the tastiness now as opposed to over a year from now ;)

I'm fairly new to using za'atar, and have come to love its unique acidity from the sumac, the ever familiar dried thyme and a bit of nutty crunch from the sesame seeds. You can buy it at spice shops, online, middle eastern grocery stores or Sarah at My New Roots has a recipe to make your own. It's great on top of hummus, used in a marinade, on grilled vegetables, etc.

ROASTED EGGPLANT + ZA'ATAR PIZZA // Serves 2-4
I give cheese measurements, but you can use your discretion depending on how you like your pizza, and how many vegetables you throw on there. The melty cheese is necessary in combination with the feta. The feta provides saltiness and flavor, but the mozzarella makes it a pizza.
I've given directions for baking, but you could just as easily do this on the grill if you don't want to turn on the oven. You can alternatively saute the eggplants, instead of roasting.

Tahini Spread
3 Tbsp. Tahini
1 Tbsp. Lemon Juice
1 Clove Garlic, minced
Pinch of Salt + Pepper

1 Eggplant
2 tsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Generous Pinch of Dried Oregano
1 Small Yellow Onion, halved and sliced
Whole Grain Pizza Crust (This recipe gives you two crusts. You can also buy a fresh dough ball from your local pizza place for convenience)
3/4 Cup Shredded Mozzarella
1 Tbsp. Za'atar
1/3 Cup Crumbled Feta
Fresh Thyme Leaves
Salt + Pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 500'. Mix all of the tahini spread ingredients together in a bowl, set aside.
2. Peel the eggplant (doesn't have to be perfect) and cut it in to small pieces. Drizzle it with the olive oil, generous pinch of salt and dried oregano. Toss to coat. Spread it on a baking sheet and roast it for 15-20 minutes. Note, you could also throw the onions on there to streamline the recipes, but I like to do it in a cast iron to really char those babies.
3. To char the onions, heat a pan over medium high heat with a dash of oil (I like to use cast iron here), add the onions and char them for about 10-15 minutes, tossing them around occasionally . The point is to cook them on high heat, without a lot of moisture, to char the sides, as opposed to caramelizing them.
4. Roll out your crust and put it on a floured/cornmeal sprinkled baking sheet. Spread the tahini spread across the surface, sprinkle the mozzarella, the eggplant chunks and charred onions, the za'atar, and the crumbled feta. Drizzle a bit of olive oil on top, and baking the pizza for 12-15 minutes until the edges crisp up. Garnish the top with a generous sprinkle of the fresh thyme leaves.

Tuesday
Jul192011

ROASTED TOMATO SOUP

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I find it funny that when you fall in love with someone, and even more so when you marry/live with them, you kind of morph into an unintentional, uni-person at times. The things you eat blend, the lingo or nicknames you have for things become everyday vernacular, you want what they want (for their sake), and circumstances that make them sad, cut you straight to the bone.

I'm the morning person who now consistently finds herself staying up late, and I swear to you we show up places in coordinating outfits that we don't notice until someone teases us. I sound like I've lost all sense of myself, but for serious, I really think it's crazy how much you're influenced when you don't even know it.

I've tried to make a point this year of spending time with people that are positive and encouraging to be around and trying to be the kind of person that someone wouldn't mind being influenced by. That's harder than you'd think, would you believe my language has gotten worse despite said intentions?

I started thinking about this, because both Hugh and I don't care for raw tomatoes. We both love salsa, marinara and roasted tomato soup, but please don't put tomatoes in my salad. But it wasn't always this way, I grew up on raw tomatoes, lots of them, the first half of my life, a 'salad' was routinely tomatoes and cucumbers with Hidden Valley Ranch dressing (Mom! I'm so grateful and I love you). We grow up and somehow the way we think or what we eat and the company we keep changes, and I find it pretty phenomenal that we refine ourselves little by little, most of the time without even realizing it. It happens right under our noses. So here I am, some version of myself but mostly a composition of people who have loved and influenced me in one way or another.

So this soup, while easy in preparation and simple in ingredients, is only as good as the tomatoes you use (pay attention, did you catch the life metaphor there?). If you have a local farmer's market, roadside farm stand or grow your own, this is the time to use them. Regardless of them being roasted, the integrity of the tomato stands out. I thought it would be good with some homemade pesto croutons, or some smoked paprika if you want a bit of heat, but it's just as comforting with a slice of crusty bread.undefined

ROASTED TOMATO SOUP // Serve 2 as an entree, 4 as a side

Because it's summer and I prefer things lighter, I honestly did not add any cream. This is your choice. It will take an edge off of the acidity, but I thought a little cheese crostini balanced it out just fine.

1 1/4 lb. Ripe Tomatoes (about 4 Large Tomatoes)
1/2 Medium Yellow Onion
3 Garlic Cloves
1 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 tsp. Sea Salt
Fresh Ground Pepper
1 Tbsp. Chopped Parsley
1 1/2 Cups Low Sodium Vegetable or Chicken Broth
1 Tbsp. Organic Tomato Paste
1/4 Cup Heavy Cream or Half and Half, optional
Fresh Oregano + Basil for garnish

Fresh Grainy Bread
Mozzarella Cheeseundefined

1. Preheat the oven to 350'. Cut the tomatoes and the half of an onion into wedges. Use your finger to push out some of the seedy parts of the tomatoes, but this is not a huge deal, just get out the big seedy parts, a bit intact is fine. Spread them on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with the olive oil and sprinkle the salt, a generous amount of pepper, the chopped parsley and gently toss it with your hands. Tuck the garlic cloves somewhere in a tomato, so they don't burn. Roast on the middle rack for 30-40 minutes until the tomatoes have broken down and reduced to about half their size. Remove and cool slightly.
2. Warm the broth and stir in the tomato paste to dissolve. Add the all of the ingredients from the roasting pan into the broth and let it gently simmer for 5-10 minutes. Use an immersion blender to puree the soup in the bowl, or with a food processor or blender. The soup should be smooth, with some texture. If you don't like any texture at all, you could run it through a fine mesh sieve. Return it back to the pot, and add the cream to taste, if using. Taste for salt and pepper.
3. Serve with some toasted bread, or broil a few slices with a piece of mozzarella on top. Garnish with fresh chopped basil and oregano.undefined